Saturday, March 26, 2011

I Lost My Temper

I lost my temper this morning.  The Washington Post had an article on the state of needlepoint in their Home and Garden section this week that made me really really mad.  And I'm not the only one.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home_garden/its-not-your-grandmothers-needlepoint/2011/03/10/AB1D08JB_story.html

ANG's Facebook page posted about it, and Catherine commented that the Post has a place where you can upload photos of our "best or most creative sewing and needlepoint projects" to their website.   So I did.  I uploaded a good number of contemporary needlepoint designs I've worked on this century.  I encourage you to do the same.  No reason we should let the Home and Garden staff remain ignorant of contemporary needlepoint!

Here's the link to the Post's page where you can upload photographs.  You will have to create an account to do so (pick a login and password) and share your email address (I think) but I've had an account with the Post for years and never gotten any spam or advertising from them.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/conversations/show-off-your-sewing/2011/02/09/ABV1OAQ_ugcgallery.html

I labeled everything "contemporary needlepoint."  Wonder if the Post is listening...?

[Jane stomps off, still swearing]

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com

7 comments:

  1. Yeah, let's all ask the WaPo: "WHY DO YOU HATE GRANDMOTHERS?" :) I'm being serious, come to think of it -- I get realllly tired of all the granny-bashing.

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  2. I'm hardly a grannie - heck, my oldest son is only 14. I've been stitching since I was 18 years old - hardly grandmother age.

    The media is *so* dumb - wish they would do a little research before they write an article.

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  3. Way to go Jane! It's really disappointing that needlepoint continues to be missed and overlooked by many as a contemporary, everchanging art form. I enjoyed revisiting your projects from years past; they are clear cut examples that we've moved waaaaaaaaay beyond dining chair seats!

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  4. So much for needlework being for grandmothers - most of the grandmothers I know can't stitch, and it's younger people who can stitch!

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  5. I echo the words above - my daughter is not even a mother yet (and lets keep it that way for now) and she does needlepoint, not much as before as she's in college but when she's home she quickly goes back to it. I remember stitching with my mother and grandmother when I was very little. Needlework is passed from generation to generation and I believe this is what the WP does not understand. And thank you Jane for the trip down memory lane - so good to see your previous projects again

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  6. It does make you wonder about the people who are writing these articles.

    Like Madonna, I also enjoyed revisiting projects that you have done through the years. Gorgeous work!

    Pierrette =^..^=

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  7. Madonna and Pierrette, thanks for the nice compliment. John, want to teach your roller ball team to needlepoint, then sicc 'em on the Washington Post?

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